Postsurgical Blindness Or Vision Loss?

Introducing Our Firm

Consult A Medical Malpractice Attorney Now — You Deserve Better

Surgical malpractice is probably pretty clear if you woke up from surgery with any degree of permanent vision loss or blindness. Anesthesia errors and other surgical mistakes involving transfusions, blood-oxygen level monitoring and blood pressure monitoring may be the culprits in postsurgical blindness or vision loss.

If you or a loved one has experienced such an injury after surgery that didn't even involve the eyes, you should consult an experienced medical malpractice attorney in New Jersey immediately.

At Hoyt & Hoyt, PC, we have been representing victims and families in medical malpractice cases for over 20 years. Attorney Jack Hoyt is a certified civil trial attorney through the New Jersey Supreme Court, a member of the Million Dollar Advocates Forum and one of the top personal injury advocates in the country.

With offices in Morristown, we represent clients throughout Morris County, Somerset County, Middlesex County and the state.

Finding Proof Of The Medical Malpractice That Caused Postsurgical Vision Loss

We know that postsurgical vision loss is caused by oxygen deprivation to the optic nerve. Surgical teams make detailed reports after every operation. Evidence showing medical malpractice is typically found within that report or the preoperation evaluation of the patient.

There are known risk factors for ischemic optic neuropathy, which is basically damage to or death of the optic nerve caused by oxygen deprivation. Patients with diabetes, patients with a history of smoking, patients with abnormally low or high blood pressure (hypertension), obese patients and patients who are operated on with their faces down or light above their heads for prolonged periods during surgery are more susceptible to ischemic optic neuropathy.

Surgical teams must discover these risk factors prior to surgery and adjust their surgical plans accordingly.

Patients with these known risk factors may develop anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (AION), which involves damage to the optic nerve head, or posterior ischemic optic neuropathy (PION), which involves damage to the rest of the optic nerve.

We will independently investigate your claim with an assembled team of specialists specific to your case, including a surgeon, an eye doctor, an anesthesiologist and an economist. We will establish the full and fair value of your case and aggressively pursue the compensation you deserve for medical expenses, treatment, lost income, inability to go back to work, disability and more.

When Is AION or PION most likely?

  • If the surgery lasted longer than six hours, there could have been a prolonged period of oxygen deprivation if the patient was under general anesthesia during surgery.
  • Look for facial swelling after surgery.
  • If the patient underwent spinal surgery or cardiac bypass surgery, PION could have occurred.
  • Hospital post-anesthesia care units (PACUs) are often overworked. PACU staff members are tasked with monitoring patient vital signs after surgery, managing pain and other important tasks. Complications can occur, and an additional period of oxygen deprivation to the optic nerve can result.

Get A Lawyer Who Can Get You Answers And Results

If medical negligence was the cause of vision loss, we will champion your recovery.

Please contact us online or call us at 973-292-2299 to get a free case evaluation. We handle all cases on a contingency fee basis, and we are available to speak with you today.

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